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<p><b>100 Best Blogs for Book Review</b><b>s</b></p><p>It
seems that a large number of book fanatics love to write about what they’ve
read almost as much as doing the actual reading. That’s a good thing for the
rest of the readers out there, because blogs about books are an excellent way
to discover great books without wasting your valuable time on the bad ones.
Along with reading top book review blogs, students are exposed to excellent classic
and contemporary books through traditional and <a href="http://www.onlinecollege.org/masters/english-literature/">online master’s degrees in English literature</a>. Check out these blogs that are all dedicated to reviewing
books.</p><p><b>General
Fiction Reviews</b></p><p>These
blogs feature book reviews across many different fiction categories such as
classics, world literature, literary fiction, mystery, young adult, and more.
The books read by these bloggers go beyond what you’d come across in typical <a href="http://www.onlinecollege.org/bachelors/english/">English degree programs</a>.</p><ol><li><a href="http://blbooks.blogspot.com/"><b>Becky’s Book Reviews</b></a>. Becky reviews all sorts of
     fiction ranging from classics to science fiction to young adult fiction.</li>
 <li><a href="http://www.booksidoneread.com"><b>books i done read</b></a>. Get plenty of witty humor with
     the book reviews on this blog.</li>
 <li><a href="http://bookshelvesofdoom.blogs.com/"><b>bookshelves of doom</b></a>. This prolific reader reviews
     books of all kinds and includes the source of her books as well.</li>
 <li><b>Absorbed in
     Words</b>. The reviews here have an
     emphasis on books translated from <a href="http://www.onlinecollege.org/masters/japanese/">Japanese</a>, but include many other fiction
     books too.</li>
 <li><a href="http://www.bookdwarf.com/"><b>Bookdwarf</b></a>. A frontlist buyer at the Harvard
     Book Store, this book lover writes reviews on literature, book covers, and
     much more on her blog.</li>
 <li><a href="http://heylady.net/"><b>Hey Lady! Whatcha
     Readin’?</b></a>. Check out the
     literary fiction reviews here that come with ratings from 1-100.</li>
 <li><a href="http://heretherebebooks.net"><b>Here There be Books</b></a>. Anastasia blogs mostly about
     fiction in young adult, fantasy, sci-fi, and adventure.</li>
 <li><a href="http://sally906.blogspot.com/"><b>Books and Musings from
     Downunder</b></a>. The reviews
     here include tons of helpful information such as genre, opening sentence,
     and rating (A+, A, B, C, D).</li>
 <li><a href="http://lostinagoodstory.blogspot.com/"><b>It’s all about me
     (time)</b></a>. These books
     cross genres ranging from chick lit to classics to world literature.</li>
 <li><a href="http://lyndasbookblog.blogspot.com/"><b>Lynda’s Book Blog</b></a>. This Welsh blogger reviews all
     types of books including thrillers, world literature, mysteries, classics,
     and even some non-fiction.</li>
 <li><a href="http://peachybooks.blogspot.com/"><b>Peachybooks</b></a>. Blogging from Britain, many of
     the books Jo writes about here are from or about the UK.</li>
 <li><a href="http://stephaniesbooks.blogspot.com/"><b>Stephanie’s Confessions
     of a Book-a-holic</b></a>. Stephanie
     participates in many book challenges and posts about them all on her blog.</li>
 <li><a href="http://corinnesbookreviews.blogspot.com/"><b>The Book Nest</b></a>. The books here tend to more
     young adult and fantasy, but a wide range of other genres are also covered
     due to the many challenges and book tours in which Corinne participates.</li>
 <li><a href="http://www.bostonbibliophile.com/"><b>The Boston Bibliophile</b></a>. Literary fiction, <a href="http://www.onlinecollege.org/masters/jewish-studies/">Jewish</a> fiction and non-fiction, and
     graphic novels are all reviewed here.</li>
 <li><a href="http://www.caribousmom.com/"><b>Caribousmom</b></a>. The books reviewed here are
     generally literary fiction, mystery, and historical novels.</li>
 <li><a href="http://rhapsodyinbooks.wordpress.com/"><b>Rhapsodyinbooks’s
     Weblog</b></a>. Written by a
     husband and wife team, this blog covers all sorts of fiction.</li>
 <li><a href="http://www.whimpulsive.net/"><b>Whimpulsive</b></a>. Mystery, young adult, memoirs,
     and historical fiction are just a few of the genres represented among
     these reviews.</li>
 <li><a href="http://www.rosecityreader.com"><b>Rose City Reader</b></a>. This prolific reviewer also
     includes links to other reviews–providing you with lots of information
     about books.</li>
 <li><a href="http://worducopia.blogspot.com/"><b>Worducopia</b></a>. Books and writing both get
     billing on this blog that features lots of fiction with some non-fiction
     also included.</li>
 <li><a href="http://webereading.com/"><b>We Be Reading</b></a>. K and Z are a mom and son team
     (with mom doing most of the actual writing) that cover both adult and
     children’s literature.</li>
 <li><a href="http://danitorres.typepad.com/workinprogress/"><b>A Work in Progress</b></a>. Biographies, historical fiction,
     mysteries, and more show up on this blog.</li>
 <li><a href="http://www.thingsmeanalot.com/"><b>things mean a lot</b></a>. The books reviewed here include
     historical fiction, general fiction, YA, graphic novels, and more.</li>
 <li><a href="http://booksonthenightstand.com"><b>Books on the Nightstand</b></a>. This blog features not only a
     variety of genres from graphic novels to “bathroom reading” to
     classics, it also offers options for how to get the book reviews with both
     written reviews and podcasts.</li>
</ol><p><b>Children
and Young Adult Reviews</b></p><p>Children’s
literature and young adult literature are the focus of these blogs.</p><ol><li><a href="http://guyslitwire.blogspot.com/"><b>Guys Lit Wire</b></a>. This blog features books that
     are of interest to teenage boys.</li>
 <li><a href="http://awrungsponge.blogspot.com/"><b>a wrung sponge</b></a>. Get reviews of children and
     young adult literature and poetry as well as books for parents here.</li>
 <li><a href="http://www.thebooknut.com"><b>Book Nut</b></a>. Melissa reviews adult fiction as
     well here, but the bulk of her posts are on children’s and young adult
     literature. She includes age ranges on each, too.</li>
 <li><a href="http://www.bookworm4life.com/"><b>Bookworm 4 Life</b></a>. Written by a librarian at a
     public library, the books here focus mostly on teen literature.</li>
 <li><a href="http://shermereem94.blogspot.com/"><b>SherMeree’s Musings</b></a>. This children’s and teen’s
     librarian reviews books from these categories. Reviews include number of
     pages, appropriate age range, and publishing information.</li>
 <li><a href="http://blaine.org/sevenimpossiblethings/"><b>Seven Impossible Things
     Before Breakfast</b></a>. While not
     following the traditional book review format, this blog gives the low-down
     on authors, illustrators, and the books themselves from this genre.</li>
 <li><a href="http://blogs.slj.com/afuse8production/"><b>A Fuse #8 Production</b></a>. Check out this blog for in-depth
     reviews of kid lit.</li>
 <li><a href="http://jkrbooks.typepad.com/blog/"><b>Jen Robinson’s Book
     Page</b></a>. Jen writes
     reviews about kid lit and includes age ranges, publication information,
     and sources of her books.</li>
 <li><a href="http://blog.mawbooks.com/"><b>Maw Books Blog</b></a>. YA fiction, kid lit, and even a
     bit of historical fiction and author interviews end up on this blog.</li>
 <li><a href="http://shelfelf.wordpress.com/"><b>Shelf Elf: read, write,
     rave</b></a>. Children’s and
     young adult’s books are featured on this blog as well as news and updates
     about books and authors in this field.</li>
 <li><a href="http://www.greenbeanteenqueen.com/"><b>GreenBeanTeenQueen</b></a>. If you are looking for reviews
     on teen and tween literature, then let this librarian guide you with her
     reviews.</li>
 <li><a href="http://thebookcellarx.blogspot.com/"><b>The Book Cellar</b></a>. The reviews of YA literature
     here are done by the 16 year-old blogger who posts a short excerpt from
     the book along with her review and a rating based on a 5-star system.</li>
 <li><a href="http://aleapopculture.blogspot.com/"><b>Pop Culture Junkie</b></a>. While most of the books here are
     YA, there are also reviews on other types of fiction as well.</li>
 <li><a href="http://www.thestorysiren.com/"><b>The Story Siren</b></a>. The YA reviews here include a
     star rating system for separate components of each book, including
     overall, plot, characters, ending, writing, and cover.</li>
 <li><a href="http://persephonereads.wordpress.com/"><b>Tempting Persephone…</b></a>. Written by a young adult
     librarian, the books here have a decidedly fantasy/alternate reality bent
     to them.</li>
</ol><p><b>Collaborative
Blogs</b></p><p>These
blogs share the reviewing work with some blogs having many reviewers and others
only a few. The differing perspectives from them offer a wider range of
opinion.</p><ol><li><a href="http://www.26books.com/"><b>26 books</b></a>. What started as one reader
     reviewing 26 books in one year has grown to multiple reviewers and
     hundreds of books.</li>
 <li><a href="http://www.bookfetish.org/"><b>BookFetish</b></a>. This collaborative blog features
     reviews on mysteries and thrillers, young adult, fantasy, and more.</li>
 <li><b>Omnivoracious’
     Amazon Blog</b>. A
     collaborative effort from Amazon.com, this blog covers everything from
     cook books to fiction.</li>
 <li><a href="http://thenewbookreview.blogspot.com/"><b>The New Book Review</b></a>. Readers, reviewers, and authors
     can submit their reviews here which cover a wide variety of genres.</li>
 <li><a href="http://booknookclub.blogspot.com/"><b>Book Nook Club</b></a>. These 13 book reviewers cover
     many different genres and encourage their readers to leave comments to for
     further discussion.</li>
 <li><a href="http://www.fiveboroughbooks.com"><b>Five Borough Book
     Review</b></a>. A group of
     20-something New Yorkers, they review books as varied as they are.</li>
 <li><a href="http://shelflove.wordpress.com/"><b>Shelf Love</b></a>. Jenny and Teresa review
     everything from classics to contemporary fiction to children’s literature.</li>
</ol><p><b>Industry
and Professional Reviewers</b></p><p>From
national newspapers to web magazines, these blogs provide reviews from
professionals.</p><ol><li><a href="http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/category/books/"><b>ArtsBeat</b></a>. This blog from the New York
     Times looks at books, their authors, and news surrounding both.</li>
 <li><a href="http://booksoupbookstore.blogspot.com/"><b>Book Soup Blog</b></a>. Book Soup is a book store in Los
     Angeles and they include reviews of new literature on this blog.</li>
 <li><a href="http://www.nybooks.com/"><b>New York Review of
     Books</b></a>. The reviews
     here focus on non-fiction books covering topics such as health care,
     politics, and more.</li>
 <li><a href="http://nyrb.typepad.com/classics/"><b>A Different Stripe</b></a>. These reviews are from The New
     York Review of Books Classics.</li>
 <li><a href="http://www.bookslut.com/blog/"><b>Blog of a Bookslut</b></a>. The blog from this popular web
     magazine covers book reviews and book news.</li>
 <li><a href="http://bookcritics.org/blog/"><b>Critical Mass</b></a>. From National Book Critics
     Circle Board of Directors, this blog not only features a wide variety of book
     reviews, but also news from the publishing industry.</li>
 <li><a href="http://www.latimes.com/books/jacketcopy/"><b>Jacket Copy</b></a>. This blog from the LA Times
     features book reviews and other publishing and book news.</li>
</ol><p><b>History
and Historical Fiction</b></p><p>Fans
of history and historical fiction will love these blogs, which provide a great
diversion for those pursuing <a href="http://www.onlinecollege.org/masters/history/">graduate degrees in history</a>.</p><ol><li><a href="http://carlanayland.blogspot.com/"><b>Carla Nayland Historical
     Fiction</b></a>. Carla writes
     about her favorite genre, historical fiction, on her blog.</li>
 <li><a href="http://age30books.blogspot.com/"><b>Age 30+…A Lifetime of
     Books</b></a>. Memoirs and
     historical fiction both feature on this mom’s blog, with the occasional
     kid lit, too.</li>
 <li><a href="http://readersrespite.blogspot.com/"><b>A Reader’s Respite</b></a>. Don’t expect any kind of dry
     account of historical fiction on this blog where high camp is king.</li>
 <li><a href="http://steventill.com/"><b>Steven Till</b></a>. Historical fiction, medieval
     history terms of the week, and a good dose of fantasy are all included on
     this blog.</li>
 <li><a href="http://www.brettschulte.net/CWBlog/"><b>TOCWOC – A Civil War
     Blog</b></a>. This blog is
     all about the Civil War and reviews mostly non-fiction works.</li>
 <li><a href="http://www.historicalnovels.info/historical-novels-blog.html"><b>News and Random Musings
     about Historical Novels</b></a>.
     This blog from HistoricalNovels.info includes plenty of book reviews.</li>
 <li><a href="http://historicaltapestry.blogspot.com/"><b>Historical Tapestry</b></a>. This collaborative blog features
     historical novels from several different eras.</li>
 <li><a href="http://juliekrose.blogspot.com/"><b>Julie K. Rose</b></a>. Written by a historical
     novelist, this blog shares book reviews, definitions of obscure words, and
     sneak peeks at books-in-progress.</li>
 <li><a href="http://writingren.blogspot.com/"><b>Writing the Renaissance</b></a>. While writing her own historical
     fiction novel, this blogger also reviews books and talks about renaissance
     history.</li>
 <li><a href="http://thebibliobrat.net/"><b>The Biblio Blogazine</b></a>. Historical fiction is this
     blogger’s book of choice, but you may see other types of books reviewed
     here too.</li>
 <li><a href="http://bookfoolery.blogspot.com/index.html"><b>Bookfoolery and Babble</b></a>. Lots of different types of books
     are reviewed here, but historical fiction and history books tend to
     surface the most.</li>
</ol><p><b>Mystery
and Thriller</b></p><p>Whether
mystery, crime, or thrillers are your thing, these blogs will offer plenty of
great suggestions for you.</p><ol><li><a href="http://www.kittlingbooks.com"><b>Kittling: Book</b></a>. Mysteries and thrillers feature
     highly here, but you can also find a smattering of historical fiction and
     biographies too.</li>
 <li><a href="http://www.bookgasm.com/"><b>Bookgasm</b></a>. Crime, mystery, thrillers, and even
     a bit of non-fiction turn up on this blog.</li>
 <li><a href="http://www.jensbookthoughts.com"><b>Jen’s Book Thoughts</b></a>. Jen reviews mystery novels and
     also includes author interviews.</li>
 <li><a href="http://drowningmachine.blogspot.com/"><b>The Drowning Machine</b></a>. Mystery and crime novels are the
     focus of this blog. Recent posts have featured a short story contest
     they’ve been running, but the book reviews should be back soon.</li>
</ol><p><b>Romance</b></p><p>Romance
novels seem to beckon a variety of different review styles and these blogs
highlight some of the best.</p><ol><li><a href="http://thebooksmugglers.com/"><b>The Book Smugglers</b></a>. Romance and fantasy books are
     both featured on this blog–and bonus points for romance fantasy books.</li>
 <li><a href="http://www.thebookbinge.com"><b>Book Binge</b></a>. These three women blog about
     their passion for romance novels.</li>
 <li><a href="http://www.ripmybodice.com/"><b>RipMyBodice.com</b></a>. The three women here write
     reviews of romance novels and don’t take themselves too seriously.</li>
 <li><a href="http://kbgbabbles.blogspot.com/"><b>Babbling About Books,
     and More</b></a>. Not only does
     KB babble about romance novels, she also has fun with words and silly
     photos.</li>
 <li><a href="http://gossamerobsessions.blogspot.com/"><b>Gossamer Obsessions</b></a>. This blogger offers an enjoyable
     breakdown of the cast of characters and the traditional romance novel
     devices used in the reviews here.</li>
 <li><a href="http://www.racyromancereviews.com/"><b>Racy Romance Reviews</b></a>. Here you’ll find a philosophy
     professor who reads romance novels and blog about the books themselves and
     the genre.</li>
 <li><a href="http://www.theintrepidreader.com"><b>ReadingAdventures</b></a>. Romance and historical fiction
     are found on this blog.</li>
 <li><a href="http://www.smartbitchestrashybooks.com/"><b>Smart Bitches, Trashy
     Books</b></a>. These two
     smart women review romance novels and give them a grade from A+ to F.</li>
</ol><p><b>Science
Fiction, Fantasy, and Adventure </b></p><p>If
you like your books a little out of this world, then check out these blogs that
feature science fiction, fantasy, and adventure.</p><ol><li><a href="http://bestsciencefictionstories.com/"><b>BestScienceFictionStories.com</b></a>. Science fiction short stories
     and novelettes are reviewed on this blog.</li>
 <li><a href="http://exclusivebooks.blogspot.com/"><b>Exclusively Books</b></a>. Written by a group of Latter-day
     Saint women, these books are mostly fantasy and adventure. The ladies warn
     of bad language and adult content, too.</li>
 <li><b>Stuff as Dreams
     are Made On…</b>. Chris enjoys
     reading and reviewing fantasy, sci-fi, YA, and even a bit of general fiction.</li>
 <li><a href="http://boldblueadventure.blogspot.com/"><b>Bold. Blue. Adventure.</b></a>. Sci-fi and fantasy are the
     favorites here, along with a good dose of YA and graphic novels.</li>
 <li><a href="http://www.thebookpirate.com/"><b>The Book Pirate</b></a>. While not all the books reviewed
     here are about pirates, it doesn’t hurt if they feature zombies, fantasy,
     or sea monsters.</li>
 <li><a href="http://www.thebookzombie.com/"><b>The Book Zombie</b></a>. Eerie seems to be the tone of
     most of these books, which may include young adult and adult literature.</li>
 <li><a href="http://jpderosnay.wordpress.com/"><b>bombastic bagman</b></a>. These book reviews tend to
     fantasy and alternate realities. Comics and mysteries that overlap with
     fantasy are also represented.</li>
 <li><a href="http://charles-tan.blogspot.com/"><b>Bibliophile Stalker</b></a>. This blog looks at books from
     the speculative fiction and fantasy genre.</li>
 <li><a href="http://www.scifiguy.ca/"><b>SciFiGuy.ca</b></a>. SciFiGuy reviews focus on urban
     fantasy, paranormal romance, and speculative fiction and fantasy.</li>
 <li><a href="http://www.thegalaxyexpress.net/"><b>The Galaxy Express</b></a>. Science fiction romance is the
     genre de jour at this blog.</li>
</ol><p><b>Graphic
Novels and Comic Books </b></p><p>It’s
time to take this genre seriously, and these blogs are a great way to learn
about it.</p><ol><li><a href="http://joglikescomics.blogspot.com/"><b>Jog – The Blog</b></a>. Manga, old-fashioned comics, and
     graphic novels are just a few of the genres reviewed here.</li>
 <li><a href="http://www.weeklycrisis.com/"><b>The Weekly Crisis</b></a>. Get comic book reviews here from
     four reviewers that include Moments of the Week, Cover of the Week, manga,
     and more.</li>
 <li><a href="http://warren-peace.blogspot.com/"><b>Warren Peace Sings the
     Blues</b></a>. Comics of all
     varieties, including manga, are reviewed here.</li>
</ol><p><b>Unique
Genres</b></p><p>From
book covers to regional authors to terrible books, these blogs offer a
perspective that’s a bit different from the rest.</p><ol><li><a href="http://nytimesbooks.blogspot.com/"><b>The Book Design Review</b></a>. This blog proves you can judge a
     book by its cover. This blog is all about the design of books.</li>
 <li><a href="http://portland.readinglocal.com/"><b>Reading Local: Portland</b></a>. Focusing on the literary world
     in Portland, Oregon, this blog features reviews of books by Portland
     authors as well as other news and events in the area.</li>
 <li><a href="http://www.inspringitisthedawn.com/"><b>In Spring it is the
     Dawn</b></a>. This Canadian
     blogger has been living in Japan for about 8 years and reviews a steady
     stream of books from Japanese writers or set in Japan.</li>
 <li><a href="http://yafabulous.echthroi.org/"><b>YA Fabulous</b></a>. This blog reviews and discusses
     young adult books with GLBT themes.</li>
 <li><a href="http://awfullibrarybooks.wordpress.com/"><b>Awful Library Books</b></a>. Two librarians have made it
     their mission to weed out terrible books that are actually on library
     shelves. See which ones they select on this blog.</li>
 <li><a href="http://judgeabook.blogspot.com/"><b>Judge a Book by its
     Cover</b></a>. In the vein of
     awful books, this blog features books with really bad covers. Beware of
     some adult content.</li>
</ol><p><b>Mixed
Bag of Genres </b></p><p>These
blogs cover a wide variety of genres and even stretch out into reviews of other
mediums such as movies.</p><ol><li><b>Blog | Book Dads</b>. This blog highlights books about
     dads and their relationships with their children. Adult, young adult, and
     children’s literature are all reviewed.</li>
 <li><a href="http://books-movies-chinesefood.blogspot.com/"><b>Books, Movies and
     Chinese Food</b></a>. Most of the
     books reviewed by this grad student are Christian fiction.</li>
 <li><a href="http://www.darkinthedark.com/"><b>it’s dark in the dark</b></a>. This blog features scary books
     and rates them on creepy factor, suspense factor, weird erotic tension
     factor, and funny and/or strange factor.</li>
 <li><a href="http://www.dreadlockgirl.com/reads/"><b>Dreadlock Girl Reads</b></a>. Dreadlock Girl reviews
     everything from literary fiction to non-fiction to movies.</li>
 <li><a href="http://skrishnasbooks.com"><b>S. Krishna’s Books</b></a>. World literature book reviews
     are featured along with music and photography on this blog.</li>
 <li><a href="http://thebottomofheaven.com/"><b>The Bottom of Heaven</b></a>. While book reviews are a large
     part of this blog, it also shares plenty of information and insight about
     black culture in America.</li>
</ol><p>September
15th, 2009 written by <a href="http://www.onlinecollege.org/about-us/">Staff Writers</a>
</p><p>

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100 Best Blogs for Book Reviews

It seems that a large number of book fanatics love to write about what they’ve read almost as much as doing the actual reading. That’s a good thing for the rest of the readers out there, because blogs about books are an excellent way to discover great books without wasting your valuable time on the bad ones. Along with reading top book review blogs, students are exposed to excellent classic and contemporary books through traditional and online master’s degrees in English literature. Check out these blogs that are all dedicated to reviewing books.

General Fiction Reviews

These blogs feature book reviews across many different fiction categories such as classics, world literature, literary fiction, mystery, young adult, and more. The books read by these bloggers go beyond what you’d come across in typical English degree programs.

  1. Becky’s Book Reviews. Becky reviews all sorts of     fiction ranging from classics to science fiction to young adult fiction.
  2. books i done read. Get plenty of witty humor with     the book reviews on this blog.
  3. bookshelves of doom. This prolific reader reviews     books of all kinds and includes the source of her books as well.
  4. Absorbed in     Words. The reviews here have an     emphasis on books translated from Japanese, but include many other fiction     books too.
  5. Bookdwarf. A frontlist buyer at the Harvard     Book Store, this book lover writes reviews on literature, book covers, and     much more on her blog.
  6. Hey Lady! Whatcha     Readin’?. Check out the     literary fiction reviews here that come with ratings from 1-100.
  7. Here There be Books. Anastasia blogs mostly about     fiction in young adult, fantasy, sci-fi, and adventure.
  8. Books and Musings from     Downunder. The reviews     here include tons of helpful information such as genre, opening sentence,     and rating (A+, A, B, C, D).
  9. It’s all about me     (time). These books     cross genres ranging from chick lit to classics to world literature.
  10. Lynda’s Book Blog. This Welsh blogger reviews all     types of books including thrillers, world literature, mysteries, classics,     and even some non-fiction.
  11. Peachybooks. Blogging from Britain, many of     the books Jo writes about here are from or about the UK.
  12. Stephanie’s Confessions     of a Book-a-holic. Stephanie     participates in many book challenges and posts about them all on her blog.
  13. The Book Nest. The books here tend to more     young adult and fantasy, but a wide range of other genres are also covered     due to the many challenges and book tours in which Corinne participates.
  14. The Boston Bibliophile. Literary fiction, Jewish fiction and non-fiction, and     graphic novels are all reviewed here.
  15. Caribousmom. The books reviewed here are     generally literary fiction, mystery, and historical novels.
  16. Rhapsodyinbooks’s     Weblog. Written by a     husband and wife team, this blog covers all sorts of fiction.
  17. Whimpulsive. Mystery, young adult, memoirs,     and historical fiction are just a few of the genres represented among     these reviews.
  18. Rose City Reader. This prolific reviewer also     includes links to other reviews–providing you with lots of information     about books.
  19. Worducopia. Books and writing both get     billing on this blog that features lots of fiction with some non-fiction     also included.
  20. We Be Reading. K and Z are a mom and son team     (with mom doing most of the actual writing) that cover both adult and     children’s literature.
  21. A Work in Progress. Biographies, historical fiction,     mysteries, and more show up on this blog.
  22. things mean a lot. The books reviewed here include     historical fiction, general fiction, YA, graphic novels, and more.
  23. Books on the Nightstand. This blog features not only a     variety of genres from graphic novels to “bathroom reading” to     classics, it also offers options for how to get the book reviews with both     written reviews and podcasts.

Children and Young Adult Reviews

Children’s literature and young adult literature are the focus of these blogs.

  1. Guys Lit Wire. This blog features books that     are of interest to teenage boys.
  2. a wrung sponge. Get reviews of children and     young adult literature and poetry as well as books for parents here.
  3. Book Nut. Melissa reviews adult fiction as     well here, but the bulk of her posts are on children’s and young adult     literature. She includes age ranges on each, too.
  4. Bookworm 4 Life. Written by a librarian at a     public library, the books here focus mostly on teen literature.
  5. SherMeree’s Musings. This children’s and teen’s     librarian reviews books from these categories. Reviews include number of     pages, appropriate age range, and publishing information.
  6. Seven Impossible Things     Before Breakfast. While not     following the traditional book review format, this blog gives the low-down     on authors, illustrators, and the books themselves from this genre.
  7. A Fuse #8 Production. Check out this blog for in-depth     reviews of kid lit.
  8. Jen Robinson’s Book     Page. Jen writes     reviews about kid lit and includes age ranges, publication information,     and sources of her books.
  9. Maw Books Blog. YA fiction, kid lit, and even a     bit of historical fiction and author interviews end up on this blog.
  10. Shelf Elf: read, write,     rave. Children’s and     young adult’s books are featured on this blog as well as news and updates     about books and authors in this field.
  11. GreenBeanTeenQueen. If you are looking for reviews     on teen and tween literature, then let this librarian guide you with her     reviews.
  12. The Book Cellar. The reviews of YA literature     here are done by the 16 year-old blogger who posts a short excerpt from     the book along with her review and a rating based on a 5-star system.
  13. Pop Culture Junkie. While most of the books here are     YA, there are also reviews on other types of fiction as well.
  14. The Story Siren. The YA reviews here include a     star rating system for separate components of each book, including     overall, plot, characters, ending, writing, and cover.
  15. Tempting Persephone…. Written by a young adult     librarian, the books here have a decidedly fantasy/alternate reality bent     to them.

Collaborative Blogs

These blogs share the reviewing work with some blogs having many reviewers and others only a few. The differing perspectives from them offer a wider range of opinion.

  1. 26 books. What started as one reader     reviewing 26 books in one year has grown to multiple reviewers and     hundreds of books.
  2. BookFetish. This collaborative blog features     reviews on mysteries and thrillers, young adult, fantasy, and more.
  3. Omnivoracious’     Amazon Blog. A     collaborative effort from Amazon.com, this blog covers everything from     cook books to fiction.
  4. The New Book Review. Readers, reviewers, and authors     can submit their reviews here which cover a wide variety of genres.
  5. Book Nook Club. These 13 book reviewers cover     many different genres and encourage their readers to leave comments to for     further discussion.
  6. Five Borough Book     Review. A group of     20-something New Yorkers, they review books as varied as they are.
  7. Shelf Love. Jenny and Teresa review     everything from classics to contemporary fiction to children’s literature.

Industry and Professional Reviewers

From national newspapers to web magazines, these blogs provide reviews from professionals.

  1. ArtsBeat. This blog from the New York     Times looks at books, their authors, and news surrounding both.
  2. Book Soup Blog. Book Soup is a book store in Los     Angeles and they include reviews of new literature on this blog.
  3. New York Review of     Books. The reviews     here focus on non-fiction books covering topics such as health care,     politics, and more.
  4. A Different Stripe. These reviews are from The New     York Review of Books Classics.
  5. Blog of a Bookslut. The blog from this popular web     magazine covers book reviews and book news.
  6. Critical Mass. From National Book Critics     Circle Board of Directors, this blog not only features a wide variety of book     reviews, but also news from the publishing industry.
  7. Jacket Copy. This blog from the LA Times     features book reviews and other publishing and book news.

History and Historical Fiction

Fans of history and historical fiction will love these blogs, which provide a great diversion for those pursuing graduate degrees in history.

  1. Carla Nayland Historical     Fiction. Carla writes     about her favorite genre, historical fiction, on her blog.
  2. Age 30+…A Lifetime of     Books. Memoirs and     historical fiction both feature on this mom’s blog, with the occasional     kid lit, too.
  3. A Reader’s Respite. Don’t expect any kind of dry     account of historical fiction on this blog where high camp is king.
  4. Steven Till. Historical fiction, medieval     history terms of the week, and a good dose of fantasy are all included on     this blog.
  5. TOCWOC – A Civil War     Blog. This blog is     all about the Civil War and reviews mostly non-fiction works.
  6. News and Random Musings     about Historical Novels.     This blog from HistoricalNovels.info includes plenty of book reviews.
  7. Historical Tapestry. This collaborative blog features     historical novels from several different eras.
  8. Julie K. Rose. Written by a historical     novelist, this blog shares book reviews, definitions of obscure words, and     sneak peeks at books-in-progress.
  9. Writing the Renaissance. While writing her own historical     fiction novel, this blogger also reviews books and talks about renaissance     history.
  10. The Biblio Blogazine. Historical fiction is this     blogger’s book of choice, but you may see other types of books reviewed     here too.
  11. Bookfoolery and Babble. Lots of different types of books     are reviewed here, but historical fiction and history books tend to     surface the most.

Mystery and Thriller

Whether mystery, crime, or thrillers are your thing, these blogs will offer plenty of great suggestions for you.

  1. Kittling: Book. Mysteries and thrillers feature     highly here, but you can also find a smattering of historical fiction and     biographies too.
  2. Bookgasm. Crime, mystery, thrillers, and even     a bit of non-fiction turn up on this blog.
  3. Jen’s Book Thoughts. Jen reviews mystery novels and     also includes author interviews.
  4. The Drowning Machine. Mystery and crime novels are the     focus of this blog. Recent posts have featured a short story contest     they’ve been running, but the book reviews should be back soon.

Romance

Romance novels seem to beckon a variety of different review styles and these blogs highlight some of the best.

  1. The Book Smugglers. Romance and fantasy books are     both featured on this blog–and bonus points for romance fantasy books.
  2. Book Binge. These three women blog about     their passion for romance novels.
  3. RipMyBodice.com. The three women here write     reviews of romance novels and don’t take themselves too seriously.
  4. Babbling About Books,     and More. Not only does     KB babble about romance novels, she also has fun with words and silly     photos.
  5. Gossamer Obsessions. This blogger offers an enjoyable     breakdown of the cast of characters and the traditional romance novel     devices used in the reviews here.
  6. Racy Romance Reviews. Here you’ll find a philosophy     professor who reads romance novels and blog about the books themselves and     the genre.
  7. ReadingAdventures. Romance and historical fiction     are found on this blog.
  8. Smart Bitches, Trashy     Books. These two     smart women review romance novels and give them a grade from A+ to F.

Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Adventure

If you like your books a little out of this world, then check out these blogs that feature science fiction, fantasy, and adventure.

  1. BestScienceFictionStories.com. Science fiction short stories     and novelettes are reviewed on this blog.
  2. Exclusively Books. Written by a group of Latter-day     Saint women, these books are mostly fantasy and adventure. The ladies warn     of bad language and adult content, too.
  3. Stuff as Dreams     are Made On…. Chris enjoys     reading and reviewing fantasy, sci-fi, YA, and even a bit of general fiction.
  4. Bold. Blue. Adventure.. Sci-fi and fantasy are the     favorites here, along with a good dose of YA and graphic novels.
  5. The Book Pirate. While not all the books reviewed     here are about pirates, it doesn’t hurt if they feature zombies, fantasy,     or sea monsters.
  6. The Book Zombie. Eerie seems to be the tone of     most of these books, which may include young adult and adult literature.
  7. bombastic bagman. These book reviews tend to     fantasy and alternate realities. Comics and mysteries that overlap with     fantasy are also represented.
  8. Bibliophile Stalker. This blog looks at books from     the speculative fiction and fantasy genre.
  9. SciFiGuy.ca. SciFiGuy reviews focus on urban     fantasy, paranormal romance, and speculative fiction and fantasy.
  10. The Galaxy Express. Science fiction romance is the     genre de jour at this blog.

Graphic Novels and Comic Books

It’s time to take this genre seriously, and these blogs are a great way to learn about it.

  1. Jog – The Blog. Manga, old-fashioned comics, and     graphic novels are just a few of the genres reviewed here.
  2. The Weekly Crisis. Get comic book reviews here from     four reviewers that include Moments of the Week, Cover of the Week, manga,     and more.
  3. Warren Peace Sings the     Blues. Comics of all     varieties, including manga, are reviewed here.

Unique Genres

From book covers to regional authors to terrible books, these blogs offer a perspective that’s a bit different from the rest.

  1. The Book Design Review. This blog proves you can judge a     book by its cover. This blog is all about the design of books.
  2. Reading Local: Portland. Focusing on the literary world     in Portland, Oregon, this blog features reviews of books by Portland     authors as well as other news and events in the area.
  3. In Spring it is the     Dawn. This Canadian     blogger has been living in Japan for about 8 years and reviews a steady     stream of books from Japanese writers or set in Japan.
  4. YA Fabulous. This blog reviews and discusses     young adult books with GLBT themes.
  5. Awful Library Books. Two librarians have made it     their mission to weed out terrible books that are actually on library     shelves. See which ones they select on this blog.
  6. Judge a Book by its     Cover. In the vein of     awful books, this blog features books with really bad covers. Beware of     some adult content.

Mixed Bag of Genres

These blogs cover a wide variety of genres and even stretch out into reviews of other mediums such as movies.

  1. Blog | Book Dads. This blog highlights books about     dads and their relationships with their children. Adult, young adult, and     children’s literature are all reviewed.
  2. Books, Movies and     Chinese Food. Most of the     books reviewed by this grad student are Christian fiction.
  3. it’s dark in the dark. This blog features scary books     and rates them on creepy factor, suspense factor, weird erotic tension     factor, and funny and/or strange factor.
  4. Dreadlock Girl Reads. Dreadlock Girl reviews     everything from literary fiction to non-fiction to movies.
  5. S. Krishna’s Books. World literature book reviews     are featured along with music and photography on this blog.
  6. The Bottom of Heaven. While book reviews are a large     part of this blog, it also shares plenty of information and insight about     black culture in America.

September 15th, 2009 written by Staff Writers

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Posted 113 weeks ago
Posted 113 weeks ago

Read a Free Preview of the 2nd book in the Handfasting Series:

Read a Free Preview of the 2nd book in the Handfasting Series:

https://read.amazon.com/kp/embed?asin=B01LWDICLX&preview=newtab&linkCode=kpe&ref_=cm_sw_r_kb_dp_80T1xbBDQMV1Y

Posted 113 weeks ago
Posted 117 weeks ago

Book 1 — The Handfasting

A Year And A Day

An Alien Worlds Romance– A witch from the right side of the tracks finds herself needing a husband to help her save her planet and is paired with a hard-bitten soldier handpicked by a computer program.

Katherine’s world is in trouble. A bioweapon had killed or sterilized all the male colonists.  Without an innovative solution, the colony is fated to die out within three generations. The Matchmaker Program locates a group of ex-soldiers without a planet and offers them a new home, pairing them with women willing to sacrifice all to save their colony from extinction.

Lieutenant Zack Jackson doesn’t have a home world anymore—it’s a pile of radioactive ash.  He desperately needs a new home for his five orphan dependents. When the Matchmaker Program chooses Katherine for him is it a match made in Heaven or Hell? Katherine needs to find out in a hurry because Zack’s five foundlings are too smart for their own good. She and Zack need to find a way to keep their kids safe from the Thieves Guild who really want back what they stole   Worse still, she is falling for her new husband and she hasn’t a clue if he feels the same about her…

A Year And A Day retails on Kindle for $2.99 and as a hard copy for $12.95 To get a preview of “A Year And A Day” click on this link:

https://read.amazon.com/kp/embed?asin=B01LWDC85U&preview=newtab&linkCode=kpe&ref_=cm_sw_r_kb_dp_73T1xb1EE3GXM

Posted 117 weeks ago

OH, NO, SOMEONE DOESN’T LIKE MY BOOK!

I just read a really nasty review of a preview of one of my books that I had posted on Create Space. For those of you who are unfamiliar with it, Create Space is a DYI affiliate of Amazon.com, which enables Indie writers like me to bypass traditional publishing houses and go straight to print or e-book. (The best thing about this publisher is that it doesn’t cost the writer a thing until a book is sold). Now as a writer, I can’t expect everyone to like what I write, but I do have an expectation that a reviewer will have made an honest attempt to read what has been put out there for preview. This wasn’t the case here. In fact the person outright admitted they didn’t get far enough into the preview to find out how many characters there were, and since the characters were introduced in the first two paragraphs, I have to say I can’t give much weight to their opinion.

Whether you are a writer or an artist, when you expose your work to the public, you had better expect others to pass judgement on it. Previews of a book are created by a writer as a tool to either boost sales (or in this case as the forum is only reviewed by other writers, to help improve their writing) and shouldn’t be used to make nasty remarks simply to feed someone’s ego. Fortunately for me, I have been in the art world long enough to recognize this type of review when I see it. It happens to artists too. But I can’t help but wonder what my reaction might have been if I had received this kind of review without my years of experience to draw on. I have seen young artists quit painting entirely after receiving similar remarks on their work. If you are the recipient of this kind of review, don’t let yourself be discouraged. Put it where it belongs–file it for experience and let it go.

For additional information, I can recommend this blog:

 http://www.indieauthornews.com/2015/03/10-ways-for-authors-to-handle-bad-book-reviews.html

Posted 125 weeks ago

COPYRIGHT LAWS AND THE VISUAL ARTIST

By the Practical Artist

http://www.thepracticalartist.com/the-practical-artists-blog.php

The visual arts category on the U.S. Government website, involves pictorial, graphic, or sculptural works, including two- and three-dimensional works of fine, graphic, and applied art. Examples include paintings, photographs; original prints; art reproductions; cartographic works (maps, globes, and relief models); technical and mechanical drawings; and architectural drawings, plans, blueprints, or diagrams.  Copyright protects an author’s specific expression in literary, artistic, or musical form. Copyright protection does not extend to any idea, system, method, device, name, or title.

The United States Copyright Office was created to serve the copyright community of creators and users, as well as the general public. Here you will find all key publications, informational circulars; application forms for copyright registration; links to the copyright law and to the homepages of other copyright related organizations; news of what the Copyright Office is doing, Congressional testimony and press releases; the latest regulations.

Copyright Basics - US Copyright Office                                

U.S. Copyright Forms

Form VA - Copyright form Visual Arts                                  

Form VA with instructions

The Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998

Due to fast-breaking developments in the electronic storage and transmission of images, an artist is expected to have a good understanding of copyright law and how it is interpreted in our rapidly changing social and high-tech landscape. “The complex and challenging issues of copyright are now part of the daily reality of all artists who work with images”.

Two basic aspects of copyright as it applies to visual artists are: what rights the artist or designer has to their own work, and what accountabilities they have when using the creative work of others. Unlike pre-internet days, images are now being broadcast all over the world and while the sheer volume of images can make it hard to track where your stuff might be used, with the right search parameters it is just as difficult to hide copyright infringement. Using copyright protected images to create art cheapens your portfolio; it isn’t good for your artistic integrity and you can be sued. Digital cameras now cost so little that everyone can take their own reference photos. Artists can also search the internet for photos that allow re-use (just check the “owner allows re-use” in your search filter).

With the creation of phot sites such as Instagram,  Flicker and Facebook, Visual artists can’t help living in an environment saturated with images. As Artists we are influenced, whether consciously or unconsciously, by everything we see around us in books, magazines, TV, the internet, and in advertising. If you use photos as reference images, you should use your own photos or public domain images. Look at the photo for inspiration but add your own creativity and “artistic license” to make the final image your own. Make sure that your image is not an exact copy of the photo. A word of warning: the “10%” use doctrine touted by many as a defense can be very subjective in a court of law and I wouldn’t want to depend on it in front of a judge. For more information on this subject, I recommend:

http://www.mondaq.com/unitedstates/x/197870/Trademark/Not+All+Is+Fair+Use+in+Trademarks+and+Copyrights

To Review

·         These days, almost all things are copyrighted the moment they are written, and no copyright notice is required.

·         Whether or not you charged money doesn’t make any difference to Copyright violations; only the damages you might have to pay out will be affected by how much money you made on your sale.

·         Postings to the internet are not automatically in the public domain, and the fact you found it there doesn’t grant you any permission to do further copying except maybe the sort of copying that might have been expected in the ordinary flow of the net and only a judge can make that decision.

·         Fair use is a complex doctrine meant to allow certain valuable social purposes. For more Information on Fair Use, go to http://www.copyright.gov.  Ask yourself why you are re-doing what you are working on and why you couldn’t have just used the subject in your own style.

·         Copyright is not lost because you don’t defend it; that’s a concept from trademark law. The ownership of names is also from trademark law, so a name can’t be copyrighted although it may still be protected under Trademark laws. If you want more information on Trademarks vs. Copyrights go to: www.uspto.gov/trademarks/law/tmlaw.pdf.

·         For those writers among you Fan fiction/slash and other work derived from copyrighted works is a copyright violation; while the owner may ignore a few fun stories presented on their characters or story lines, if you try and sell it the owner will have to take notice in order to protect their copyright.

·         Copyright law is mostly civil law where the special rights of criminal defendants you hear so much about on TV don’t apply. Watch out, however, as new laws are moving copyright violation into the criminal realm and who knows what the future may bring. Remember all those people who went to jail or got fined millions of dollars from downloading music?

·         Don’t rationalize that you are helping the copyright holder by using his or her stuff; often it’s not that hard to ask permission.

·         While posting E-mail is technically a violation, revealing facts from E-mail you got isn’t, and for almost all typical E-mail, nobody could wring any damages from you for posting it. The law doesn’t do much to protect works with no commercial value.

Disclaimer: The information in this blog is for general information purposes only; it is not intended to be tax or legal advice. Each situation is specific; consult your CPA or attorney to discuss your specific legal or tax requirements or questions.

Posted 129 weeks ago
tumblr photo tumblr photo
Posted 130 weeks ago
<p><b>DEALING WITH NEGATIVE OR MALICIOUS POSTINGS</b></p><p>What response do
you make when some person posts a negative opinion of you or your work on your
website or a social network site? Some tips on what you can do about this
without starting a major public feud and how to turn a negative into a positive
action. Congratulations. You now have a brand new web-site (or blog site). You
have spent hours designing it and putting into it everything you think will
help you make it popular. Whether you created this site in the hopes of
developing an audience for your writing, selling your art, promoting a
non-profit organization, business or for some other reason your new site is
precious to you and you need to share it with the world at large. There are so
many ways to do this beginning with sending e-mails to friends and family,
advertising on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Google AdWords, etc.</p><p>Most of these sites
have suggestions as to how to reach other members to tell them about your new
site. After you have followed instructions from these sites to publicize your
work,  in a couple of days when you call
up your site to see if anyone has actually looked at it, and among the positive
comments posted, you discover that someone has written something ugly either
about the site, your work or you and posted it on <i>your</i> site. This is a little like having someone kick your baby and
you are justifiably offended. The question is what do you do now?</p><p>In answering this
I’m going to make a couple of assumptions: 1) you haven’t done anything to the
negative poster to make them want to embarrass you by publicly posting ugly
comments to your site, and 2) this isn’t someone you know well because
obviously if you were well acquainted with them you wouldn’t have sent an
invitation in the first place.  If you
are like me your first impulse would be to slap back at this person. This is
entirely a normal reaction and it is a perfectly understandable, human impulse
to strike out at what injures us. However, I urge you not to give in to this
impulse. If you start an insult slinging match by posting a nasty response to
the negative comment on your site it will only increase the adverse impression of
your site with potential customers and visitors that this person has created.
It also will make you look unprofessional and probably detract from your sites
message which should be about the work or ideas you have presented there.</p><p>You <i>can</i> take positive action when this
happens, but first you need to make sure it doesn’t happen again. Your first
action should be to find out a little about who this person is and how they
came to visit your site. When you do find out this information I advise you to
resist the itch to retaliate by posting something ugly in return on <i>their</i> site. I understand you would like
them to know how you felt but this will only escalate matters, so don’t do it!
Once you know who they are, simply remove the comment from your site and if the
site offers this feature, arrange to moderate any future comments posted. If
the person posted the comment using Facebook or Twitter, you may need to change
those settings also to require comments to have your approval before being
posted.</p><p>You should realize
that if this person received an invitation to view your site the invitation may
have come from you, especially if you were innocently following suggestions to
increase your circle of influence put out by LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook or
Google. All of these sites encourage members to make new connections by
checking out other members who are interested in the same things, belong to the
same groups, follow the same companies, etc. and send out invitations to
connect. These suggestions are not necessarily bad; in fact you may make some
valuable acquaintances and good friends by using them. Please be aware however
that the old adage about kissing frogs also applies; you may also have
unintentionally reached out to some people who practice behavior my mother used
to call “rude, crude, and socially unacceptable”. You won’t be able to screen
these folks out ahead of time because this kind of character reference does <i>not</i> get posted on their self-created
profiles! Hateful people exist and they just love to spread their discord and repulsive
behavior onto others. The positive thing you can do I mentioned? Sometimes it
helps to visualize yourself blowing a big, noisy, fat raspberry at this person,
and then start a “Do Not Send” list <b><i>and check it before you send out invitations
to view your work</i></b>. Good luck!</p><p><b>Gail</b></p>

DEALING WITH NEGATIVE OR MALICIOUS POSTINGS

What response do you make when some person posts a negative opinion of you or your work on your website or a social network site? Some tips on what you can do about this without starting a major public feud and how to turn a negative into a positive action. Congratulations. You now have a brand new web-site (or blog site). You have spent hours designing it and putting into it everything you think will help you make it popular. Whether you created this site in the hopes of developing an audience for your writing, selling your art, promoting a non-profit organization, business or for some other reason your new site is precious to you and you need to share it with the world at large. There are so many ways to do this beginning with sending e-mails to friends and family, advertising on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Google AdWords, etc.

Most of these sites have suggestions as to how to reach other members to tell them about your new site. After you have followed instructions from these sites to publicize your work,  in a couple of days when you call up your site to see if anyone has actually looked at it, and among the positive comments posted, you discover that someone has written something ugly either about the site, your work or you and posted it on your site. This is a little like having someone kick your baby and you are justifiably offended. The question is what do you do now?

In answering this I’m going to make a couple of assumptions: 1) you haven’t done anything to the negative poster to make them want to embarrass you by publicly posting ugly comments to your site, and 2) this isn’t someone you know well because obviously if you were well acquainted with them you wouldn’t have sent an invitation in the first place.  If you are like me your first impulse would be to slap back at this person. This is entirely a normal reaction and it is a perfectly understandable, human impulse to strike out at what injures us. However, I urge you not to give in to this impulse. If you start an insult slinging match by posting a nasty response to the negative comment on your site it will only increase the adverse impression of your site with potential customers and visitors that this person has created. It also will make you look unprofessional and probably detract from your sites message which should be about the work or ideas you have presented there.

You can take positive action when this happens, but first you need to make sure it doesn’t happen again. Your first action should be to find out a little about who this person is and how they came to visit your site. When you do find out this information I advise you to resist the itch to retaliate by posting something ugly in return on their site. I understand you would like them to know how you felt but this will only escalate matters, so don’t do it! Once you know who they are, simply remove the comment from your site and if the site offers this feature, arrange to moderate any future comments posted. If the person posted the comment using Facebook or Twitter, you may need to change those settings also to require comments to have your approval before being posted.

You should realize that if this person received an invitation to view your site the invitation may have come from you, especially if you were innocently following suggestions to increase your circle of influence put out by LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook or Google. All of these sites encourage members to make new connections by checking out other members who are interested in the same things, belong to the same groups, follow the same companies, etc. and send out invitations to connect. These suggestions are not necessarily bad; in fact you may make some valuable acquaintances and good friends by using them. Please be aware however that the old adage about kissing frogs also applies; you may also have unintentionally reached out to some people who practice behavior my mother used to call “rude, crude, and socially unacceptable”. You won’t be able to screen these folks out ahead of time because this kind of character reference does not get posted on their self-created profiles! Hateful people exist and they just love to spread their discord and repulsive behavior onto others. The positive thing you can do I mentioned? Sometimes it helps to visualize yourself blowing a big, noisy, fat raspberry at this person, and then start a “Do Not Send” list and check it before you send out invitations to view your work. Good luck!

Gail

Posted 131 weeks ago
<p><b>TIPS ON PHOTOGRAPHING YOUR ART FOR THE WEB </b></p><p>Presentation is everything; especially on the internet where the only
impression you can make is what is seen by the viewer. A poor presentation can
make the difference between getting a sale or not and being accepted into an
on-line show or a show requiring submissions on disc. For the judges to get an
accurate idea of your art, the image you send must match the colors in the art
and be sharp and clear. </p><p>For many of us, taking a good photograph of our art is hard. Before sending
off the photo of your art your art make sure that the size of the photo agrees
with the directions given by the prospectus, and make sure the image is sharp,
clear and not distorted. Then check the colors in the photo against the actual
art to make sure they are correct. I am not a professional photographer,
but I do manage to take credible photos of my work without paying a pro to do
it for me. Even if you are only making a record of your work, you will want it
to be as close to the original as possible. Here are a few tips that might help
those of us who are “photo challenged”:</p><p><b>LIGHTING</b></p><p>Make sure you are taking the photo in an area that
doesn’t cast shadows or cause glares on the work. Personally, I prefer to take
my photos outside on a clear day using indirect sunlight. I don’t use an
elaborate set up; I have simply put a nail into the Garage Door at the
appropriate height for the camera and then I rest the painting’s stretcher bars
on the nails. If you are using paper or canvas sheets, you can attach the
sticky stuff teachers use to hang students artwork on the wall to the back of
the art (after making sure your art is level).</p><p>Make
sure the sun isn’t glaring on the work so there are no shinny surfaces to
reflect back at the camera lens. If you are working with watercolor or pastel
then take the photo before you frame it because glass will reflect back at the
camera. I also take the photo before I varnish acrylics to cut down on the
glare caused by the varnish.</p><p>If
your camera is set up to put a polarizing filter over the lens, it may be worth
your while to buy one, especially if you work in Oil paints or other naturally
shinny mediums. If your camera won’t take a filter, you can try the “poor man’s
sub” and buy a pair of polarizing sun glasses and put them in front of your
lens. The only real issue I see with this cheap fix is that the lens on the
sunglasses may not be flat and so create a bubble effect on the photo.</p><p><b>DISTORTION</b></p><p>In
order to avoid distorting the image, the art should be hung on a flat surface.
If the final photo is wider at the bottom than the top or vice versa, perhaps your
hanging surface isn’t flat and you will need to take corrective action in your photo-editing
program or find another surface.</p><p>Make
sure that your camera is aimed squarely at the art. It helps to use a tripod;
you can align the front two feet of the tripod squarely with the art so that
you aren’t taking the photo at an angle that will cause one side of the art to
be larger than the other. If necessary use a tape measure to make sure the feet
are an equal distance from the art, and check to make sure the camera isn’t
twisted on the tripod. A tripod also helps to prevent blurring is caused by
your hand shaking. Most of us don’t think our hand moves when pushing the
button, but it does.</p><p>Use
a small hand level to ensure that the camera is not angled either down or up
when taking the photo as this will also cause distortion. A laser pointer (your
pets toy is adequate) laid alongside the lens when measuring will also help you
to line up your lens on your art.</p><p><b>CAMERAS</b></p><p>You
don’t need an expensive camera just to take photos of your art. Canon makes an
excellent quality digital camera for under $300 and it is very user friendly.
As a plus, the newer models also take video so you can use the video setting to
record art shows or yourself when creating the art, and then upload to
Facebook, U-tube and other social network sites.</p><p>However
if you are planning to make large-size reproductions of your work then a good
SLR camera should be on your list. SLR stands for single-lens reflex. This type
of camera allows you take enormous photos, which translate well into prints as
large as 48 x 60 without blurring.</p><p><b>CAMERA SETTINGS</b></p><p>When
taking the initial (raw) photo of your work, be sure to set your camera to take
fine or large files and take at least 3 exposures of each artwork. </p><p><b>EDITING PHOTOS </b></p><p>I
find the least expensive and easiest to use photo-editing program, is Adobe Photoshop
Elements. It has tutorials and is easy to learn. Before making any additional
copies, check for any corrective actions that you need to take; you can then
make additional copies at different resolutions.</p><p>Check
first for distortions. Photoshop makes it easy to correct the distortions caused
by not having your camera lined up correctly with the artwork.</p><p>Next,
check the contrast of the photo against the original if is dull then increase
the contrast if necessary.</p><p>The
next step is to check the actual color and correct if the image shows too much
blue, green or red.</p><p>Your
last step should be to crop the photo of your work so that only the work shows.
I usually also crop a very tiny piece of the edges as well to keep the curve on
the edge of my canvas from appearing as a distortion. Then save the photo as a
PDF so you can go back to it in its original form. Save it again as a tiff
image and then as a jpeg. You will be working with the jpeg format, but this
format does develop a slight blurring or distortion when saved multiple times. </p><p><b>YOU NEED THREE TYPES OF JPEG IMAGES FOR
THE WEB</b></p><p>Image
No 1 should be a large resolution image (between 1 and 2 MB between 300 – 600
pixels per inch) POD sites usually demand a large high-resolution image to make
prints; usually between 38,000 and 60,000 pixels on a side.<b></b></p><p>The
second image should be a medium/low resolution image to put on your website and
submit to prospective galleries or anyone else who needs to see your work. This
size is (between 1 – 2 KB at 72 pixels/inch or adjust the widest side to be
between 7 and 10 inches) and will be large enough to allow the viewer to see
the art. It is too small to encourage attempts to pirate your image because it
probably won’t make prints any larger than a 5 x 7 without blurring, but you
can add digital watermarking with Elements or other watermarking programs.</p><p>A
small image (between 200 and 125 pixels at the widest edge) for thumbnail
images and record keeping; for those of you who prefer sizes given in inches,
the widest edge should be no more than 4”.</p><p>You should keep photo log with both high- and low- resolution photos of
your work separately from your desktop computer; the new flash drives are
excellent for this or you can use one of the on-line backup programs. A working
copy can be kept on your desktop or tablet, but be sure and back up your files
each month onto a separate disc or jump drive. Keep the back-up copies of these
items in a separate place and up-date your back-ups monthly. There are also
some cloud features that will enable you to automatically back-up your digital
files (for a price). While these are handy to use, if you are late paying the
monthly fee, how do you reclaim your images? Once your records are lost due to
computer crashes, natural disaster or any other reason they are gone. Good
Luck!</p><p><b>Gail</b></p><p> Other Links: <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nvR7fCQLQyI">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nvR7fCQLQyI</a> is a video tutorial you may also find helpful.</p>

TIPS ON PHOTOGRAPHING YOUR ART FOR THE WEB

Presentation is everything; especially on the internet where the only impression you can make is what is seen by the viewer. A poor presentation can make the difference between getting a sale or not and being accepted into an on-line show or a show requiring submissions on disc. For the judges to get an accurate idea of your art, the image you send must match the colors in the art and be sharp and clear.

For many of us, taking a good photograph of our art is hard. Before sending off the photo of your art your art make sure that the size of the photo agrees with the directions given by the prospectus, and make sure the image is sharp, clear and not distorted. Then check the colors in the photo against the actual art to make sure they are correct. I am not a professional photographer, but I do manage to take credible photos of my work without paying a pro to do it for me. Even if you are only making a record of your work, you will want it to be as close to the original as possible. Here are a few tips that might help those of us who are “photo challenged”:

LIGHTING

Make sure you are taking the photo in an area that doesn’t cast shadows or cause glares on the work. Personally, I prefer to take my photos outside on a clear day using indirect sunlight. I don’t use an elaborate set up; I have simply put a nail into the Garage Door at the appropriate height for the camera and then I rest the painting’s stretcher bars on the nails. If you are using paper or canvas sheets, you can attach the sticky stuff teachers use to hang students artwork on the wall to the back of the art (after making sure your art is level).

Make sure the sun isn’t glaring on the work so there are no shinny surfaces to reflect back at the camera lens. If you are working with watercolor or pastel then take the photo before you frame it because glass will reflect back at the camera. I also take the photo before I varnish acrylics to cut down on the glare caused by the varnish.

If your camera is set up to put a polarizing filter over the lens, it may be worth your while to buy one, especially if you work in Oil paints or other naturally shinny mediums. If your camera won’t take a filter, you can try the “poor man’s sub” and buy a pair of polarizing sun glasses and put them in front of your lens. The only real issue I see with this cheap fix is that the lens on the sunglasses may not be flat and so create a bubble effect on the photo.

DISTORTION

In order to avoid distorting the image, the art should be hung on a flat surface. If the final photo is wider at the bottom than the top or vice versa, perhaps your hanging surface isn’t flat and you will need to take corrective action in your photo-editing program or find another surface.

Make sure that your camera is aimed squarely at the art. It helps to use a tripod; you can align the front two feet of the tripod squarely with the art so that you aren’t taking the photo at an angle that will cause one side of the art to be larger than the other. If necessary use a tape measure to make sure the feet are an equal distance from the art, and check to make sure the camera isn’t twisted on the tripod. A tripod also helps to prevent blurring is caused by your hand shaking. Most of us don’t think our hand moves when pushing the button, but it does.

Use a small hand level to ensure that the camera is not angled either down or up when taking the photo as this will also cause distortion. A laser pointer (your pets toy is adequate) laid alongside the lens when measuring will also help you to line up your lens on your art.

CAMERAS

You don’t need an expensive camera just to take photos of your art. Canon makes an excellent quality digital camera for under $300 and it is very user friendly. As a plus, the newer models also take video so you can use the video setting to record art shows or yourself when creating the art, and then upload to Facebook, U-tube and other social network sites.

However if you are planning to make large-size reproductions of your work then a good SLR camera should be on your list. SLR stands for single-lens reflex. This type of camera allows you take enormous photos, which translate well into prints as large as 48 x 60 without blurring.

CAMERA SETTINGS

When taking the initial (raw) photo of your work, be sure to set your camera to take fine or large files and take at least 3 exposures of each artwork.

EDITING PHOTOS

I find the least expensive and easiest to use photo-editing program, is Adobe Photoshop Elements. It has tutorials and is easy to learn. Before making any additional copies, check for any corrective actions that you need to take; you can then make additional copies at different resolutions.

Check first for distortions. Photoshop makes it easy to correct the distortions caused by not having your camera lined up correctly with the artwork.

Next, check the contrast of the photo against the original if is dull then increase the contrast if necessary.

The next step is to check the actual color and correct if the image shows too much blue, green or red.

Your last step should be to crop the photo of your work so that only the work shows. I usually also crop a very tiny piece of the edges as well to keep the curve on the edge of my canvas from appearing as a distortion. Then save the photo as a PDF so you can go back to it in its original form. Save it again as a tiff image and then as a jpeg. You will be working with the jpeg format, but this format does develop a slight blurring or distortion when saved multiple times.

YOU NEED THREE TYPES OF JPEG IMAGES FOR THE WEB

Image No 1 should be a large resolution image (between 1 and 2 MB between 300 – 600 pixels per inch) POD sites usually demand a large high-resolution image to make prints; usually between 38,000 and 60,000 pixels on a side.

The second image should be a medium/low resolution image to put on your website and submit to prospective galleries or anyone else who needs to see your work. This size is (between 1 – 2 KB at 72 pixels/inch or adjust the widest side to be between 7 and 10 inches) and will be large enough to allow the viewer to see the art. It is too small to encourage attempts to pirate your image because it probably won’t make prints any larger than a 5 x 7 without blurring, but you can add digital watermarking with Elements or other watermarking programs.

A small image (between 200 and 125 pixels at the widest edge) for thumbnail images and record keeping; for those of you who prefer sizes given in inches, the widest edge should be no more than 4”.

You should keep photo log with both high- and low- resolution photos of your work separately from your desktop computer; the new flash drives are excellent for this or you can use one of the on-line backup programs. A working copy can be kept on your desktop or tablet, but be sure and back up your files each month onto a separate disc or jump drive. Keep the back-up copies of these items in a separate place and up-date your back-ups monthly. There are also some cloud features that will enable you to automatically back-up your digital files (for a price). While these are handy to use, if you are late paying the monthly fee, how do you reclaim your images? Once your records are lost due to computer crashes, natural disaster or any other reason they are gone. Good Luck!

Gail

 Other Links: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nvR7fCQLQyI is a video tutorial you may also find helpful.

Posted 132 weeks ago

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